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Six Nations – A History Lesson

The Five Nations Championship, with its predecessor, the Home Championship, was the premier international rugby union tournament in the northern hemisphere. After 12 years of occasional friendly matches between the teams, the inaugural Home Championship, comprising England, Ireland, Scotland and Wales was played in 1883. The addition of the French in 1910 brought the number of nations to five, and it was another 90 years before a sixth team, Italy, joined the competition. Since then it has been known as the Six Nations Championship. The competition is something of an anomaly since the Irish team is comprised of players from both Northern Ireland and the Republic.

Played annually, the format is simple: each team plays every other team once, with home field advantage alternating from one year to the next. Two points are awarded for a win, one for a draw and none for a loss. Victory in every game results in a so-called “Grand Slam”, victory by a home nation (i.e. excluding France and Italy) over the three other home nations is a “Triple Crown”. The victors of the game between England and Scotland win the Calcutta Cup.

The importance of the competition has decreased slightly since the introduction of the Rugby Union World Cup, but the long standing rivalries between teams mean that it remains a passionate and fiercely contested prize.

Results

Results of the Four (1883-1909), Five (1910-1999) and Six Nation championships. Prior to 1994, teams equal on points shared the championship. After that date, ties were broken by considering the points difference of the teams.

1883 England
1884 England
1885 Incomplete
1886 England and Scotland
1887 Scotland
1888 Incomplete
1889 Incomplete
1890 England and Scotland
1891 Scotland
1892 England
1893 Wales
1894 Ireland
1895 Scotland
1896 Ireland
1897 Incomplete
1898 Incomplete
1899 Ireland
1900 Wales
1901 Scotland
1902 Wales
1903 Scotland
1904 Scotland
1905 Wales
1906 Wales and Ireland
1907 Scotland
1908 Wales (Grand Slam)
1909 Wales (Grand Slam)
1910 England
1911 Wales (Grand Slam)
1912 England and Ireland
1913 England (Grand Slam)
1914 England (Grand Slam)
1915-19 Not held due to World War I
1920 England, Scotland and Wales
1921 England (Grand Slam)
1922 Wales
1923 England (Grand Slam)
1924 England (Grand Slam)
1925 Scotland (Grand Slam)
1926 Scotland and Ireland
1927 Scotland and Ireland
1928 England (Grand Slam)
1929 Scotland
1930 England
1931 Wales
1932 England, Wales and Ireland
1933 Scotland
1934 England (Grand Slam)
1935 Ireland
1936 Wales
1937 England (Grand Slam)
1938 Scotland
1939 England, Wales and Ireland
1940-46 Not held due to World War II
1947 Wales and England
1948 Ireland (Grand Slam)
1949 Ireland
1950 Wales (Grand Slam)
1951 Ireland
1952 Wales (Grand Slam)
1953 England
1954 England, France and Wales
1955 France and Wales
1956 Wales
1957 England (Grand Slam)
1958 England
1959 France
1960 France and England
1961 France
1962 France
1963 England
1964 Scotland and Wales
1965 Wales
1966 Wales
1967 France
1968 France (Grand Slam)
1969 Wales
1970 Wales and France
1971 Wales (Grand Slam)
1972 Incomplete
1973 Five way tie
1974 Ireland
1975 Wales
1976 Wales (Grand Slam)
1977 France (Grand Slam)
1978 Wales (Grand Slam)
1979 Wales
1980 England (Grand Slam)
1981 France (Grand Slam)
1982 Ireland
1983 France and Ireland
1984 Scotland (Grand Slam)
1985 Ireland
1986 France and Scotland
1987 France (Grand Slam)
1988 Wales and France
1989 France
1990 Scotland (Grand Slam)
1991 England (Grand Slam)
1992 England (Grand Slam)
1993 France
1994 Wales
1995 England (Grand Slam)
1996 England (Grand Slam)
1997 France (Grand Slam)
1998 France (Grand Slam)
1999 Scotland
2000 England
2001 England
2002 France (Grand Slam)
2003 England (Grand Slam)

This entry was posted on Sunday, February 1st, 2004 at 12:52 pm and is filed under Six Nations. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed.


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